I Think My Gums Are Receding Miami, FL

At Judy Mejido DMD PA, we focus on the health of our patients’ gums just as much as we do on their teeth. We understand the critical nature of the gums and the role they play in keeping teeth healthy, strong, and intact. Through regular dental care, we can work to prevent gum disease. In certain situations, regular dental care is all a patient needs. However, if you do notice that your gums begin to recede, call (305) 434-4804 and schedule an appointment with our Miami, FL dental office. Since gum recession can lead to further health challenges, it is important to address the issue right away.

Why are gums receding from my teeth?

There can be several reasons for this, and some of them may have to do with lifestyle. For example, it is important to brush your teeth at least twice a day and floss once a day. However, if you use a hard toothbrush or brush too aggressively, you can actually irritate your gums and cause them to recede. This is why we recommend that you use a soft or electronic toothbrush whenever possible. You want to make sure you are gentle when brushing near your gums, regardless of what you are using.

Your gums can also recede due to gum disease. This is actually the most common reason for the condition. At Judy Mejido DMD PA, we find that gum disease can impact patients of all ages, and when it does, it is critical that you come in for a dental cleaning and treatment. Otherwise, you can begin to see the gums recede or pull away from the teeth. The cause is plaque that becomes trapped between the teeth and gums. Since you cannot clean this area, it remains in place, turns into tartar, and irritates your gums. The irritation will get to the point that the gums swell, bleed, become irritated, and eventually recede.

Genetics can also give you receding gums, so if your parents had this problem, you may as well.

If your teeth are crooked and your bite is out of alignment, additional strain could be placed on some of your teeth. As a result of abnormal wear patterns, your gums could begin to suffer and eventually recede.

Why are my gums receding only on one side?

If your gums are only receding on one side, it could be simply because plaque just happens to have built up in this area of the mouth. Plaque does not discriminate, but there is a chance that you could have brushed or flossed better on one side of your mouth, or it could be a simple fluke that plaque became trapped in one area but not the other. Another plausible solution is that this mirrors general wear patterns. If your teeth are crooked and your bite is off, your gum health will also be impacted disproportionally.

Why are my gums receding on one tooth only?

While this could be related to the other causes listed above, it is most likely to do some type of dental trauma. Perhaps this particular area of the mouth was cut or suffered a severe abrasion. Whether the injury was caused by eating something sharp, your nail scratched it, or an outside force cut you, gums can sometimes have difficultly healing and may recede as a result of that injury.

Should I worry about receding gums? Are they really a sign of trouble?

Yes, you should. At Judy Mejido DMD PA, we encourage all our patients to pay attention to their gum health. We encourage them to call us right away if they see their gums bleeding, swelling or receding. We want to examine the patient as soon as possible in order to determine if gum disease is present and treat it. You are best served by receiving immediate care since we can treat the problem using less invasive methods. For example, you may only need a deep cleaning if you come in right away or perhaps you will need an antibiotic treatment as well, but by coming in early, you give your gums the best chance for restoration without the need for a gum graft. Otherwise, if you delay, they could recede to the point that the health of your teeth, your jawbone, and your entire smile are at risk. After all, the majority of people who lose an adult tooth also had gum disease at the time. Preventing and treating it is truly one of the best things you can do for your oral health.

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How do you prevent gum recession?

The best way to prevent gum recession is to visit our dental office for a teeth cleaning twice per year. We can remove the plaque and tartar that has built up over time in order to give your teeth a fresh clean feel while also reducing the likelihood that plaque or tartar will build up. Additionally, you can begin to use a soft toothbrush and monitor how aggressively you brush your teeth.

Is there a way to treat the condition?

Yes, if you are suffering gum recession due to gum disease, we must remove the disease. Generally, this requires us to perform a deep cleaning procedure in order to remove the plaque and tartar from the area in between the teeth and the gums. Once done, your gums can begin to heal and rejuvenate. There are also some laser procedures that we can use to help stimulate the gum tissue so it can begin to grow again. Otherwise, if the recession is really bad, you will need a gum graft to restore the tissue around the teeth as a protective measure.

What are the risks of not treating it?

Very simply, you could lose your teeth. Gum recession is typically caused by gum disease. The idea of not treating it is an incredibly risky option because it means that in addition to experiencing uncomfortable teeth and gums, you are also likely to suffer from bone and tooth loss.

To learn more about sleep apnea or discuss your oral health in general, call 305-434-4804 and schedule an appointment with our Miami dental office. At Judy Mejido DMD PA, we are happy to discuss your health challenges and make recommendations, even if we have to refer you to a specialist for treatment.

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Definition of Dental Terminology

Cosmetic Dentistry

Cosmetic dentistry is generally used to refer to any dental work that improves the appearance (though not necessarily the function) of a person’s teeth, gums and/or bite.

Decay

Tooth decay is when the enamel of the tooth begins to decay and cause erosion from plaque and tartar on the teeth.

Dental Caries

Dental caries are also known as cavities and result from a lack of proper oral hygiene leaving plaque that forms tiny holes in the teeth.

Dental Checkup

A dental checkup is an appointment that involves cleaning the teeth, identifying any signs of infection and removing said signs of infection at least once every six months in the office.

Dental Filling

A dental filling involves restoring the structure of the tooth by using metal, alloy, porcelain or plastic to fill the tooth.

Dental Prophylaxis

A dental prophylaxis is a professional and detailed cleaning that involves the removal of plaque, calculus and stains from the teeth.

Dental Sealants

Dental sealants contain a resinous material that we apply to the chewing surfaces of the posterior teeth to prevent dental caries.

Dentist

A dentist, also known as a dental surgeon, is a doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases and conditions of the oral cavity.

Gingivitis

Gingivitis is the inflammation of gum tissue that results from plaque, other infections in the mouth and poor oral hygiene.

Preventive Dentistry

Preventive dentistry is the dentistry that focuses on maintaining oral health in order to prevent the spread of plaque, the formation of tartar and infections in the mouth.

Tartar

Tartar forms when plaque builds up on the surface of the teeth and calcifies into a hard surface that is much more difficult to remove and will require professional treatment.

Tooth Enamel

Tooth enamel is the protective visible outer surface of a tooth that contains the dentin and dental pulp.

Helpful Related Links

  1. American Dental Association (ADA). Glossary of Dental Terms. 2015
  2. American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry® (AACD). Home Page. 2015
  3. WebMD. WebMD’s Oral Care Guide. 2015

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  1. Judy Mejido DMD PA was established in 1994.
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